sim·plic·i·ty

simˈplisədē/
noun

» the quality or condition of being easy to understand or do.

» the quality or condition of being plain or natural.

» a thing that is plain, natural, or easy to understand.

Qualities associated with clarity, ease.
It’s deceptive. And here’s why. What is simple isn’t always easy. Humans tend toward all things easy – the path of least resistance.
 
We also tend toward the immediate pleasure and gratification of what we want right now.
 
And we don’t impulsively move toward delayed satisfaction. While we can and do show restraint sometimes, this is a deliberate exercise.
 
Compound this with the constant barrage of “always on” media, and we begin to think there’s something we don’t know yet. A new secret and we’re somehow not in the club.
 
In the last two years I’ve navigated hypothyroid, Hashimoto’s and adrenal fatigue. A sudden weight gain triggered my search for a cause. That’s how I found out. For a while I searched for the best doctor. I read about the best medicine. I tried new techniques.
 
I tried “new” diets. Keto. Macro counting. Food logging. Intermittent Fasting. Juicing. Paleo. Bulletproof. I even tried Anorexia when I was in school.
 
Healthy? Maybe. For some.
 
I signed up for a triathlon thinking, “Surely I’ll lose weight!” Nope. I gained 8 pounds. How is that even possible? My mind wasn’t in the right place. And now I know that the stress I was putting on my body was having the exact opposite effect I was after.
 
I’ve found that restriction, counting, obsessing have a shadow side for me. These habits recall those thoughts and feelings that drove me to anorexia in the first place.
 
It’s not good. It doesn’t serve me. I get grumpy. I’m not fun to be around. I don’t want that for sure.
 
So this begs the question: how do I find health, true wellness if none of these “diets” worked for me?
 
I could argue that some of these diets worked. A little. But in truth, it’s likely that I did some of the simple things by default. And that’s more likely what worked to bring healing. And lasting weight loss.
 

I’ve returned to the simple basics.

The kind of advice your grandma would give:
 
Eat less and move a little more. Gently.
Pack in the veggies.
Eat less red meat.
Limit white starchy food.
Don’t drink as much.
Eat the cake and enjoy it.
Drink more water.
Take a nap.
Go to be early.
Spend time with your favorite people. (I would add: unplugged.)
Moderation. Not restriction. And be honest with yourself about what is actually “moderate.”
 
If you feel overwhelmed by “all the things” or underwhelmed with lack of results, take a look at your routine. Where can you simplify? Which could you NOT do? What is or is not serving you?
 
How will you remind yourself about the long term goal before the immediate temptation wins?